Every Thanksgiving feast is not complete without dessert. Often people eat seconds and thirds on Thanksgiving, making the dessert course often saved until later. I personally like to have something sweet after this large meal.

With these two desserts, I am featuring two prominent Louisiana ingredients, Pecans and Sweet Potatoes. While both of these ingredients are often found in other Thanksgiving dishes, I feel that they really shine when included in a dessert. Pecan pies are a staple in Southern homes. Often, sweet potatoes are also made into pies for the holidays, but I wanted to share two different types of desserts. Here are my suggestions for this year’s dessert table.

Pecan pie is a perfect dessert any time of the year. If I could, I would have Chef Frank Brigtsen, in New Orleans, ship me one of his pecan pies. Since he does not ship, I make my own. One year, I was looking to put a twist this classic. Since chocolate tends to dominate dessert menus, I thought I would add some to my pecan pie. The results were well received. Now, I get as many request for a chocolate pecan pie as a do a regular one.

Chocolate Pecan Pie

3 cups Sugar
Pinch of Salt
7 tablespoons Unsweetened Cocoa
4 Large Eggs
1 tablespoon Vanilla
1 (12 ounce can) Evaporated Milk
1 stick Butter, melted
1 cup Pecan Halves
2 unbaked Deep Dish Pie Shells

Preheat oven to 350℉.

In a medium bowl, mix the sugar, salt and cocoa together. In a small bowl, whisk together the eggs, vanilla and milk. Stir into the dry ingredients. Add the melted butter and stir until well blended. Sprinkle pecan halves into the pie shell, about 1/2 cup per shell. Pour the filling over the pecans. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes.

Creme Brûlée is often thought of as a fancy dessert. While it does lend itself to upscale dinners, Creme Brûlée is a great dessert anytime. This recipe is great for the holidays. Most Creme Brûlées are served individually. This one is served in a large dish, so you can eat as much or as little as you want. Since you have just eaten a large Thanksgiving meal, a small portion of dessert is a great way to end your meal.

Sweet Potato Creme Brulée

1 very large Sweet Potato, baked, peeled and mashed (1 1/4 cups)
1/4 cup packed Light Brown Sugar
1 tablespoon fresh Lemon Juice
2 cups Whipping Cream
3/4 cups Granulated Sugar
7 Egg Yolks, slightly beaten
3 teaspoons Vanilla
1/3 cup Turbinado Sugar (Sugar in the Raw)

Preheat oven to 325℉.

Butter a 10-inch quiche dish.

In a medium bowl, mix mashed sweet potatoes, brown sugar and lemon juice. Spoon mixture into quiche dish.

In a 2-quart sauce pan, stir together the whipping cream, granulated sugar, egg yolks and vanilla. Cook over medium-low heat about 15 minutes, stirring frequently, until hot (do not boil). Pour over sweet potato mixture. Place dish in shallow pan. Place pan in oven. Pour enough boiling water into pan to depth of 3/4 inch (about halfway up the side of the dish). Bake 1 hour or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out almost clean. Carefully remove the dish from the water. Cool on cooling rack. Cover; refrigerate at least 8 hours.

When ready to serve, set oven control to broil. Sprinkle custard with raw sugar. Place dish on a sheet pan. Broil with top 4 to 6 inches from heat for 3 to 5 minutes or until the sugar is melted. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.

Now that we have ended our Thanksgiving feast with something sweet, time to clean up the kitchen and put away the leftovers. My mind starts thinking what to do with the leftover turkey. Next time, I will share with you a couple of my favorite turkey recipes.