Most people have a sweet tooth. In New Orleans, the praline(pronounced prah-leen) is the sweet of choice. For over 80 years, Aunt Sally’s has been selling pralines at the French Market in the French Quarter. In 1935, Pierre and Diane Bagur opened the first Aunt Sally’s. The company now consist of two locations and an online store, which you can purchase New Orleans gifts and souvenirs, including their world famous pralines.

In France, the praline is made with almonds as their nut component. When the French settled in Louisiana, they found that pecans were abundant. Many New Orleans recipes use pecans instead of almonds. Today, i am sharing 3 different flavors of pralines, Traditional, White Chocolate and Orange.

Traditional Pralines
2/3 cup Sugar
2/3 cup Light Brown Sugar, firmly packed
1/2 cup Evaporated Milk
3 tablespoons Vanilla Extract
1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) Butter
1 cup Pecans, chopped into small pieces

Add both sugars and milk in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Heat and stir about 15 to 18 minutes, to a softball stage. ( A softball stage is 235-240℉, using a Candy Thermometer to measure. At this temperature, the sugar mixture dropped into cold water will form a soft, flexible ball. If you remove the ball from the water, it will flatten like a pancake after a few minutes in your hand.) Cook 3-4 minutes longer. Remove from heat and add the butter and vanilla. Let the butter melt then add the pecans slowly and mix well. Spoon out pralines on wax paper coated with cooking spray to cool.

In my opinion, white chocolate makes a dessert classier. In almost any dessert, white chocolate can be substituted for regular chocolate. I use white chocolate every chance I get. My wife enjoys it better than milk chocolate.

White Chocolate Pralines
1 1/2 cups Sugar
3/4 cup Brown Sugar, firmly packed
1/2 cup Butter
1/2 cup Milk
1 1/2 cup Pecans, chopped into small pieces
2 ounces White Chocolate Baking Squares, chopped into pieces

Combine all ingredients. Cook low, stirring constantly, until sugar and butter melts. Bring to a boil and increase the heat to medium. Continue to stir constantly for 3 minutes or until it reaches a softball stage. Remove from heat and beat with a wooden spoon until mixture begins to thicken. This may take up to 5 minutes. Drop by spoonfuls onto wax paper coated with cooking spray.

South of New Orleans is Plaquemines Parrish. Every year in December at Fort Jackson in Buras, Louisiana, the Orange Festival is celebrated. Through numerous freezes and hurricanes, the citrus farmers of Plaquemines Parish have endured. The yearly celebration is a testament to their hard work and perseverance. To honor the farmers, I have included an Orange flavored Praline.

Orange Pralines
1 quart Heavy Cream
2 1/4 cup Sugar
1 Orange
1 tablespoon light Corn Syrup
1 1/2 cup Pecans, chopped into small pieces

Pour the cream and sugar into a large heavy-bottomed pot. Grate the ring of the orange over the pot. Add the corn syrup and pecan pieces. Over medium heat, stir the mixture often until it becomes very thick and a candy Thermometer registers 275℉, about 1 hour.

Remove the pot from the heat. Drop the mixture by the tablespoon onto waxed paper coated with cooking spray.

These praline recipes will surely cure your sweet tooth.